5 Proven Ways To Find Your Music Brand Identity (pt. 1)

To establish your music brand’s core you MUST know who you are, what you stand for, what’s your sound type, what is your general narrative, who is likely to listen to you, what artists you are most similar to, so on and so forth. Whilst apparently an easy task, accurately identifying your unique position on the market is a herculean challenge. If you’re on a tight budget and can’t afford to hire a brand consultant, follow the 5 proven ways that’ll help you find your musical identity. Make sure you also check out part 2 that’ll help you even more with pinpointing your value on the market as a music artist.

5. Make A List Of Who Inspired You As An Artist The Most

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The human brain learns through first-hand study. As an artist, you are very likely to sound similar to the musicians you used to listen to as a child/ teenager. Don’t wait for the answer to stare you in the face ’cause by then it’ll be too late. Pick a pen and paper and write a thorough list of artists you used to heavily vibe to for years. Then read the list out loud and say what exactly about their music you enjoyed so much. Chances are, you’ve already incorporated that in your own songs.

4. Perform Covers Of Other Artists

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We’ve conducted a fun experiment here at Blue Rhymez Entertainment and discovered that the songs an artist likes are rarely the ones he/ she is able to flawlessly perform. Usually, the artist has a go-to catalog and a would-like-to repertoire. You should direct your brand acuity towards the type of songs you can actually easily perform and hit the proper notes while staying on pitch. What you think you should sound like is very unlikely what you are meant to sound like. Embrace your natural skills and improve them.

3. Read Into The Comments You Get On Social Media

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If you’ve had more than 10 people telling you repeatedly that you sound like a young Avril Lavigne, maybe you should take pointers. People are a lot more objective towards someone else’s music than they are with their own craft. If fans keep telling you your Rock song sounds phenomenal and they’d like to hear more of it, at least try it out. At the end of the day, your fans will pay your bills so pay attention to what they blurp on social media. They very often make great points.

2. Take A Personality Test

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Often knowing your mental self is even better than fully knowing your musical self. Go to https://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test and see which one of the 16 personalities you resemble the most. If you’re the neurotic type that gets bored uber easily, writing deep Rap music may not be for you after all. Your music has to represent your true, inner, God-given self.

1. Grasp The Emotions Your Music Creates Within You

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This method is so pivotal and life-altering that if you don’t try it out the moment you’re reading this article, maybe you shouldn’t be doing music after all. Always know that you can only fully give to others of what you already fully own. Meaning… If you’ve been through a lot of loss and pain in this life, doing bubble gum Pop won’t get you anywhere because your essence lays in much deeper layers. Don’t be afraid to fully express your nature and talk about your unique life experience. Then stand aside and journal what emotions are the easiest to write about and summon on a consistent basis. Some of you have been through such extreme poverty that you have enough anger to last you a lifetime as a Rap artist. So what’s your dominant emotion? What stands at the basis of your creation?

Add the 5 methods and you’re light years ahead of the competition who’s barely starting out and has yet to learn the difference between mixing and mastering.

Blue Rhymez Entertainment ©2021

If you want to make the world a better place by helping 50 stellar indie artists arduously working 24/7 to give you authentic music, stream the playlist below.

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